In Which There is a Summer Convention Wrap-up!

With Inktober so close to the horizon (two days away omgerd!), I’m finally sitting down and working on typing up a wrap-up for the last two months of conventions. And yes, this is absolutely a case of me putting this off way too long up to the point that I can’t wait any longer if I’m going to get this done, SO HERE WE GO!

Otakon 2017

Me and my table at Otakon 2017Ah, my old friend, Otakon. I am probably one of the few who was completely jazzed that the convention was moved to DC, because not only is it easier for me to get to, it’s location is prime for delicious foods that I normally don’t get (also, any excuse to get to ride the Metro is a good excuse).

It’s been six years (!!!) since I’ve had a table at an anime convention, so I will admit I was very nervous about what to expect. Especially since I purposefully have stripped all fanart from my table– and knowing that fanart is pretty much the bread and butter of an anime artist alley.

My Dragon Age Nerd ShowingHowever, I was pleasantly surprised by the turnout of sales. They were lower than I hoped, but higher than I expected– if that makes any sense. I had a lot of people stop by the table and want to talk shop– specifically about my watercolors and my technique. This gives me hope for my goal for next year– starting to stream (or at least record) my painting.

I also had a lot of awesome Dragon Age fans stop by my table and talk Dragon Age to me (well, I did have a sign after all). It felt me feel more in touch with the convention– as I am hopelessly out of date with what anime fans watch these days. I like YOI just like everyone else, but other than that? Yeah, I’m probably not into it and/or haven’t even watched it. Most of my fandoms have always been on the outside of what is “popular,” so I’m used to that. But boy, did I feel it more than ever at Otakon this year.

A commission in progress
A commission in progress

I was completely wrong in my assumptions of what items people would want. I thought my holographic posters would have flown off the shelves like hotcakes, but I didn’t sell one. I was completely shocked. Everyone commented on how pretty it was, but no one wanted it. It could of been a case of pricing?

Another thing I thought was going to be popular was the makeup bags. And again, I was completely wrong. Not one sold. People were far more interested in the tote bags, which I sold out of, and just glanced over the makeup bags.

Finished commission
Finished commission

The most popular thing, however by far, were commissions. I got so. many. My only conclusion for all of this is that, my art style was appealing to people– just not the prints I was selling? Or the prices? And it’s not really a case where you can go up to people and be like “IS IT MY PRICES? ARE THEY TOO HIGH?” without having them run away screaming for security.

Walking around the alley, my prices pretty much matched with what else I saw, so it was just confusing. It could also be a case of people willing to pay a price for fanart of a character they know and love, but not so much for an original character they have no connection to.

The whole table, for now, was a lot of space for me. But it was nice being able to spread out, and also having table room for doing the commissions. I didn’t feel cramped in the slightest– and I really liked the idea of not being boxed in by an overhang display.

Final Thoughts

Next year, more totes, less posters. Also, apparently people don’t really go to flip through portfolios anymore, so I have to think up a different display. Commissions were my bread and butter here, so maybe also next year, I don’t need to make as many prints. Utilize your space better, maybe by setting up the stuff for sale on one side, then leaving the other half for a display of me drawing/painting?

Small Press Expo

SPX set-upSPX was a separate beast all to itself. Instead of having an entire table, I had 1/4 of a table– which became clear very quickly was not enough room. The wire set up also blocked me out completely, which made it hard for people to see that I was there, or you know, talk to me.

Back in the Spring, when I ended up not getting a table in the lottery, I pretty much resigned myself to focusing on illustration and portfolio stuff for the rest of the year. And so I did just that, finishing at least one illustration every month. Little did I know, my pal Spenser ended up offering to share his half table. But I got that invite less than three months before the convention. My summer was super busy with a new job and commission web work, which left me with no time to plan, much less draw, a new zine for the expo.

I was zineless at a zine event.

You can guess how well that went.

Spenser peddling our wares
Spenser peddling our wares

I’ll just come out and say it– it was kind of a disaster for me. Sales really were bad for me. The only thing I really sold were, again, the tote bags. I sold out of tote bags within the first two hours of the show!

Since I knew I didn’t have much to offer comics wise, I figured that sales wouldn’t be great, so I didn’t have a hotel room. In trying to save money, I ended up driving back and forth from my house, an hour plus drive. It was really draining to know after a day of very slow sales, I had a long drive to still go home before I could finally sleep. Yeah, it wasn’t great. Not doing that one again. Hotel rooms ftw!

But that’s not to say the entire show was bad for me. I had great conversations and met some awesome people– like Nilah Magruder, who is an amazing artist, and my new favorite person (psssst check out her art). Also Gale Galligan, who I hadn’t seen since SPX 2015, had some adorable zines that I picked up and just devoured. They are so cute. Not to mention, I made a fool of myself fangirling over HamletMachine and her art (I’ve been a Starfighter fan since it’s launch so many years ago ;_;) . It was also great to hang out with Spenser again. He and I haven’t seen each other since before I moved to Japan, so it was great being able to see him and catch up. I may have also ruined Civil War for him, but shhhhhh don’t bring it up.

And that’s the point of SPX, right? To chill with your friends and get some comics? So, despite how bad sales were for me,  I can’t help but love the vibe of SPX. I look forward to it every year, and I will definitely try again for the lottery next year.

Final Thoughts

TOTE BAGS. I will have at least two more designs for tote bags by SPX next year, if not more. Not only do people want them at the show to carry their goods around, they are a great way to get my art around a very crowded artists’ room. I also saw a lot of amazing zines this year, and I want to be able to have some of my own next year. Short stories/comics are a huge weakness for me, and I need to face that weakness head on, and challenge myself to knock some out before the next SPX. I’m aiming for two, along with a sketch zine, but if I can do more than that, great!

 

So I guess that’s my next year’s worth of art planned out!

October 1st marks the beginning of Inktober. I haven’t decided whether I’ll be posting each illustration every day, or doing a weekly/biweekly dump. I guess it all depends on how busy the illustrations keep me. I’ve made some of my best stuff in past Inktobers, so I am really looking forward to it this year.

So that’s it for conventions for 2017. Until next year…

Have nugs, will travel
Have nugs, will travel!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *